How To Lose $200 & Learn To Trust Yourself – Part II

“We now return you to a post already in progress.”  If you’re just joining the fun, feel free to head to my home page and check out Part I of this post.  Or you can start from here and be mildly confused.  Both are great options.

I’m a carb kid.  I was not prepared for the week long sugar detox. The body aches, the sweats, the headaches, the wearing two shirts, a sweater, a hoodie and flannel pants with two pairs of socks while under a down comforter, chills.  No one told us about that part.  No one brought it up in class for fear of looking weak.  We were a “family”.
Continue reading “How To Lose $200 & Learn To Trust Yourself – Part II”

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How To Lose $200 & Learn To Trust Yourself – Part I

Every day when you choose to use (the internet), you are bombarded by the latest and greatest in Health & Fitness.  Whether it’s an article about Oprah and the 12 million dollar weight-loss tweet, or how to burn fat by eating only sponges for a week, you will see it on your feed.  How appropriate that we call it a “Feed”.  Sooner or later we all cave in and go for the gusto with a new diet, workout plan or both.

In the spring of 2014 I decided to participate in a program here in Vegas by a local fitness club.  It was a popular boot camp program that promised to help you get in shape and the goal was to lose 20 LBs in 6 weeks. Continue reading “How To Lose $200 & Learn To Trust Yourself – Part I”

How I Learned to Thrive & Other Tales of “Whoa!”

Cannonball.

 

In the past year I’ve had some absolutely amazing experiences that have helped me find my way back to the path of shameless creativity.  I say shameless because for a time (4 years), I felt as though what I was doing, what I wanted to do, was something to hide.  I stopped saying I was an actor.  Or a singer.  Or anything creative that would make me look like a flight risk to what I refer to at times as “the outside world”.  I moved from a city that embraced my diversity and all my quirks as an artist, to a place where I felt I didn’t fit the mold.  I made that move because I was scared.  Scared that as a newly engaged woman, people now had expectations of me and those expectations could only be fulfilled if I settled down.  I felt pressure from myself and others.  I wanted people to like me.  I wanted them to know that I wasn’t a gamble.  I left what I knew, what had made me successful up to that point, and what was familiar for the imagined promise of “stability”. Continue reading “How I Learned to Thrive & Other Tales of “Whoa!””